Storytelling Flaws By (The Villainous) Edward Stone

 

A well-dressed gentleman walks into the room and tips his hat Top of the mornin’ to you. I’m Edward. Edward Stone.

Gabrielle: shoves Edward out of the way I do the introductions around here, ok? They’ll get confused if you do it.

Edward: glares You could always change it up a little.

Gabrielle: ignores him Hi friends!

Edward: mutters something about a lame introduction

Gabrielle: Be quiet, Edward. turns to readers As I hinted in my last post, I’m implementing a few changes. I’ve invited one of my villains––

Edward: cough Lord Executive Master and High Ruler of the One Hundred sectors, thirty-two divisions, and two realms. cough

Gabrielle: …to help me out with a few things. I want to share what I know about storytelling with you guys. However, I’ve got my hands full with Rook, and Edward has volunteered to take some weight off my back. Gabrielle shoots a concerned glance at the grinning Edward I’m slighting concerned he’s only doing this so he can take over my blog (he’s slightly obsessed with taking over things. I think he has control issues), but this will be fun. Once or twice a month, he’ll take the reins and––

Edward: steps in front of Gabrielle Ahem, My turn. You said I could announce my own series.

Gabrielle: Fine. But make sure you give them enough information.

Edward: waves Gabrielle away Now that that’s over with, let me give you a proper introduction. In all honesty, I’m a crook, not a professor. But any villain’s got to know how to weave a good tale, tug on the emotions, that sort of thing. I know a fair bit about storytelling.

Enough to know there are a lot of bad stories out there. I can’t help but groan when a good story is ruined by a glaring flaw.

Since I don’t want you all to fail miserably and create stories I can’t enjoy, I’m starting a––what does she call it––a blog series. I’ll be exposing a storytelling flaw in each post, covering subjects like character development, story structure, prose, and the like, so you can avoid them.

Is that clear? Good. disappears in an epic cape swoosh, mysterious fog swirling

Gabrielle: stares at where he disappeared

I hope that wasn’t a massive mistake. I’ll see you all next week with my Somethings, then it’s Edwards turn.

We’ll see how this goes.

Sincerely,

-Gabrielle R. Pollack (and Edward Stone)

 

8 thoughts on “Storytelling Flaws By (The Villainous) Edward Stone

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

w

Connecting to %s