My 9 Somethings for September

Hey friends!

I hope life is treating you well! My month was a rather calm one but not without its quirky happenings. 🙂 Welcome to my 9 Somethings for September!

Something Related to Writing

I’m done with Ridgeline!

*yells from the rooftop* *dances in the rain* *throws glitter that sticks to my wet hair*

This story is one of the most natural books I’ve written yet. I outlined but didn’t force myself to stress too much over scene structure and theme, like I’ve done before. There’s a bunch of issues (it’s the first draft, after all), but I’m still thrilled with it. 🙂 The current word count is 68,757.

I also had a major breakthrough regarding Rook’s new book, Ceasefire. The story had been missing a certain something I couldn’t name, but when a new idea hit me, the whole thing came to life. 🙂 Was I brainstorming when I should have been writing Ridgeline? Maaaaaybe.

I’m planning on writing Ceasefire during Nanowrimo. 🙂

I had two articles published on SE this month!

Don’t Let Pressure Kill the Joy in Your Writing and How to Use Details in Action Sequences. *beams with pride* Read more

Don’t Let Writing Be Your Identity

Hey friends!

Over half a year ago, I published this piece on Kingdom Pen at the start of the new year.  As a Christian, it’s still a struggle for me to remember my identity lies in God’s grace, not my writing, so this article is still something I deeply relate to.

That said, I thought I’d tweak it a bit and share it with you today. 🙂


Fiction writers are extraordinary people. They slave away at their craft, earning their talent through years of hard work and endless dedication. They pour emotion and soul into their manuscripts. Their stories naturally become a part of them.

As fallen artists, we often associate our identity with our work. We don’t realize it, but we attempt to measure our value by the quality of our writing, our place in a certain writing group or stereotype, or the approval of readers. Misplaced identity grows harmful thought patterns that drain our joy. Writing becomes a drain, not a labor of love.

Harmful Pattern #1: Comparison and Jealousy

This is a trap many writers, myself included, fall into without a second thought. We read the work of others on a regular basis, whether we’re critiquing, beta reading, or casually flipping through the pages of a book. Sometimes the characters are extremely vibrant, the settings practically breathe with life, and the themes leave us speechless. We unconsciously hold another writer’s product beside our own work-in-progress. Our characters whom we adore suddenly seem mediocre at best, flat at worst. Our settings are cliché and our theme is only meaningful to us. Read more

Storytelling Flaws #1: Flat Villains

(Here’s the series introduction so you’re not completely confused by my special guest and the dialogue nature of this post.)


Edward: strolls into the room Have you seen my coat?

Gabrielle: doesn’t look up from reading the Count of Monte Cristo It’s in the coat closet. You left it on the floor, so I picked it up for you.

Edward: Why would you do that?

Gabrielle: I got motivated to clean for once. shudders Characters can get really messy.

Edward: I leave my things on the floor for a reason. There is a place for everything, and for everything there is a place.

Gabrielle: You just said the same thing twice.

Edward: Silence, peasant.

Gabrielle: Aren’t you supposed to be teaching a lesson or something?

Edward: Realizes he’s being watched by readers Ahem. he straightens Good morning, friends.

Gabrielle: mutters something about a lame introduction

Edward: glares at her In this inaugural post, I want to cover a topic very dear to my heart (if I had one). No, I don’t speak of the tampering of personal property. sends a pointed glare Gabrielle’s way

I want to discuss the greatest sin of all literary misdemeanors.

Pauses for dramatic effect

I speak of flat villains. Read more