Five Free Resources to Help You Survive the Brainstorming Process

Free resources are fantastic for boosting your creative juices while making friends with your wallet. Here is a list of five epic resources I’ve tested out myself to help you brainstorm.

#1. Trello

This tool kept me sane during the initial stages of Ridgeline brainstorming.

Trello is a collaboration program that lets you create boards and fill them with cards. While brainstorming Ridgeline’s plot, I could create a board for each scene, add a few cards, and rearrange them with a simple drag. Trello lets you upload files and pictures, add comments, and much more. Though I don’t use it for Ridgeline at the moment, it was still a massive help for organizing my scattered ideas.

Tip: I’m obsessed with personalizing my accounts. I discovered early on Trello lets you change the pictures behind your boards. Though it doesn’t let you upload your own, it gives you a nice selection to choose from.  All you have to do is open your menu and find the “Change Background” option.

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I added a few pics so you could see what a board looks like with photos.

#2. Color Note

This app has saved the lives of hundreds of ideas. I’ve used Color Note at all hours of the night when that annoying burst of inspiration hits and I fumble around in the dark for a place to write my ideas. Read more

Don’t Let Writing Be Your Identity

Hey friends!

Over half a year ago, I published this piece on Kingdom Pen at the start of the new year.  As a Christian, it’s still a struggle for me to remember my identity lies in God’s grace, not my writing, so this article is still something I deeply relate to.

That said, I thought I’d tweak it a bit and share it with you today. 🙂


Fiction writers are extraordinary people. They slave away at their craft, earning their talent through years of hard work and endless dedication. They pour emotion and soul into their manuscripts. Their stories naturally become a part of them.

As fallen artists, we often associate our identity with our work. We don’t realize it, but we attempt to measure our value by the quality of our writing, our place in a certain writing group or stereotype, or the approval of readers. Misplaced identity grows harmful thought patterns that drain our joy. Writing becomes a drain, not a labor of love.

Harmful Pattern #1: Comparison and Jealousy

This is a trap many writers, myself included, fall into without a second thought. We read the work of others on a regular basis, whether we’re critiquing, beta reading, or casually flipping through the pages of a book. Sometimes the characters are extremely vibrant, the settings practically breathe with life, and the themes leave us speechless. We unconsciously hold another writer’s product beside our own work-in-progress. Our characters whom we adore suddenly seem mediocre at best, flat at worst. Our settings are cliché and our theme is only meaningful to us. Read more

Announcing Rooftop Writing Prompts (and Free Stuff)

I come to you with an important announcement. Drumroll, please.

*holds breath*

I started another website! 😀

Remember those writing prompts I told you about in my last Somethings? Well, apparently posting a few on my blog wasn’t enough for me

I created another website so I could obsess over this new idea. I call it, “Rooftop Writing Prompts.”

Why call it Rooftop Writing Prompts? First of all, I needed a cool name. Adding “rooftop” to anything makes it sound cool. Just try it.

The rooftop has also been one of my favorite writing spots. I’ve chilled up there writing anything from a book to an article to a blog post. I want it to become a symbol of creativity and inspiration.

To learn more about my new website, click here.

or here.

or here.

They all lead to the same place. I’m just a little excited, so you get more than one link. 😛

But that’s not all I’m excited about. To celebrate this new website, I’m giving out a free book of writing prompts to anyone and everyone who signs up for my mailing list!

*throws confetti* I put a lot of brainpower into this one, my friends. These prompts are just waiting for someone to turn them into a fabulous story. All you have to do is sign up here and the collection is all yours.

Enjoy your weekend!

-Gabrielle R. Pollack (a.k.a. Master of the Rooftop)

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3 Ending Fails (and How to Avoid Them) by Edward Stone

*Disclaimer: This blog series is written from the perspective of Gabrielle’s villain, Edward. Gabrielle does not claim all of Edwards opinions as her own. She does not believe modern society needs to be destroyed, though she’s really hoping none of her readers need that clarification.

Oh, and there may be an Avengers: Infinity War spoiler below. You’ve been warned.


Gabrielle: sits atop a picnic table, tapping away at her keyboard

Edward: wanders nearby, practicing an evil monologue …and that’s why I believe modern society should end. There is a purity in death, an innocence in starting over. Even ashes are white.

Gabrielle: gives him a weird look Why are you being so dramatic?

Edward: I’m preparing. You never know when you will run into a hero you must impress with your eloquence. Besides, it’s a perfect introduction.

Gabrielle: Introduction to what?

Edward: Our lesson on endings.

Gabrielle: Of course.

Edward: turns to readers Endings give extra value and resonance to a story. Unfortunately, writers are not infallible. They botch their endings, just like Gabrielle bungles most of her art pieces.

Gabrielle: Hey!

Edward: But never fear, you don’t have to fail like Gabrielle. If you avoid long resolutions, sudden tone changes, and unconnected character arcs, you’re well on your way to a strong ending. Read more