3 Ending Fails (and How to Avoid Them) by Edward Stone

*Disclaimer: This blog series is written from the perspective of Gabrielle’s villain, Edward. Gabrielle does not claim all of Edwards opinions as her own. She does not believe modern society needs to be destroyed, though she’s really hoping none of her readers need that clarification.

Oh, and there may be an Avengers: Infinity War spoiler below. You’ve been warned.


Gabrielle: sits atop a picnic table, tapping away at her keyboard

Edward: wanders nearby, practicing an evil monologue …and that’s why I believe modern society should end. There is a purity in death, an innocence in starting over. Even ashes are white.

Gabrielle: gives him a weird look Why are you being so dramatic?

Edward: I’m preparing. You never know when you will run into a hero you must impress with your eloquence. Besides, it’s a perfect introduction.

Gabrielle: Introduction to what?

Edward: Our lesson on endings.

Gabrielle: Of course.

Edward: turns to readers Endings give extra value and resonance to a story. Unfortunately, writers are not infallible. They botch their endings, just like Gabrielle bungles most of her art pieces.

Gabrielle: Hey!

Edward: But never fear, you don’t have to fail like Gabrielle. If you avoid long resolutions, sudden tone changes, and unconnected character arcs, you’re well on your way to a strong ending. Read more

Storytelling Flaws #1: Flat Villains

(Here’s the series introduction so you’re not completely confused by my special guest and the dialogue nature of this post.)


Edward: strolls into the room Have you seen my coat?

Gabrielle: doesn’t look up from reading the Count of Monte Cristo It’s in the coat closet. You left it on the floor, so I picked it up for you.

Edward: Why would you do that?

Gabrielle: I got motivated to clean for once. shudders Characters can get really messy.

Edward: I leave my things on the floor for a reason. There is a place for everything, and for everything there is a place.

Gabrielle: You just said the same thing twice.

Edward: Silence, peasant.

Gabrielle: Aren’t you supposed to be teaching a lesson or something?

Edward: Realizes he’s being watched by readers Ahem. he straightens Good morning, friends.

Gabrielle: mutters something about a lame introduction

Edward: glares at her In this inaugural post, I want to cover a topic very dear to my heart (if I had one). No, I don’t speak of the tampering of personal property. sends a pointed glare Gabrielle’s way

I want to discuss the greatest sin of all literary misdemeanors.

Pauses for dramatic effect

I speak of flat villains. Read more